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JFarrow
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  • Tampa, FL
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Beautiful Nation Photos

Daintree Strangler Fig

Daintree Strangler Fig captured in the biggest Rain Forest in Australia  and the second biggest rain forest in the world!

The Daintree Rainforest is a tropical rainforest on the north east coast of Queensland, Australia, north of Mossman and Cairns. At around 1,200 km2 (460 sq mi),[citation needed] the Daintree is the largest continuous area of tropical rainforest on the Australian continent. Along the coastline north of the Daintree River, tropical rainforest grows right down to the edge of the sea.

[source]

Volcanic Island Between Indonesia and Thailand

Indonesia, with over 18,000 counted islands, is by far the largest and most varied archipelago on Earth. It spans almost 2 million square kilometers between Asiaand Australia

Positioned on the Equator, across a region of immense volcanic activity, Indonesia has some 400 volcanoes within its borders, with at least 90 still active in some way. 

Many of the islands here are still uninhabited, with the larger islands of Java, Kalimantan (Borneo), Irian Jaya (Papua), Sumatra and Sulawesi home to most of the population base. 

Forming a bulk of the modern population are Austronesian peoples, who migrated from Taiwan around 2000 BC seeking out the ideal agricultural conditions. The strategic sea-lane positioning of Indonesia also played host to the cultivation of international trade withChina and Indian kingdoms. 

Through the early centuries AD a number of small states flourished across Indonesia, including the Tarumanagara who produced some of the earliest known inscriptions on Java island. 

By the 7th century BC the Srivijaya naval kingdom had established on Sumatra, importing with them the influences of Hinduism and Buddhism, and shaping much of the southeast Asiamaritime. 

The Srivijayan's were severely weakened by a series of Chola raids in the 11th century, and by 1414 had completely ceased to exist. 

Islam made its way to Sumatra during the slow downfall of the Srivijayan kingdom, and in its wake the Majapahit state formed. Under the ruling of Gajah Mada, Indonesia experienced a Golden Age, and extended through much of the southern Malay Peninsula, Borneo, Sumatra and Bali. 

[Read More at World Atlas]

Off the coast of Sicily

Sicily (ItalianSicilia [siˈtʃiːlja]) is the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea; along with surrounding minor islands, it constitutes an autonomous region of Italy, the Regione Siciliana(Sicilian Region).

Sicily is located in the central Mediterranean. It extends from the tip of the Apennine peninsula, from which it is separated only by the narrow Strait of Messina, towards the North African coast. Its most prominent landmark is Mount Etna, which is at 3,320 m (10,890 ft) the tallest active volcano in Europe and one of the most active in the world. The island has a typicalMediterranean climate.

The earliest archeological evidence of human dwelling on the island dates from as early as 8000 BC. At around 750 BC, Sicily was host to a number of Phoenician and Greek colonies and for the next 600 years it was the site of the Greek–Punic and Roman–Punic wars, which ended with the Roman destruction of Carthage. After the fall of the Roman Empire in the 5th century AD, Sicily often changed hands, and during the early Middle Ages it was ruled in turn by the VandalsOstrogothsByzantinesArabs and Normans. Later on, the Kingdom of Sicily lasted between 1130 and 1816, first subordinated to the crowns of AragonSpain, the Holy Roman Empire, and finally unified under the Bourbons with Naples, as the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies. Following the Expedition of the Thousand, a Giuseppe Garibaldi-led revolt during the Italian Unification process and a plebiscite, it became part of Italy in 1860. After the birth of the Italian Republic in 1946, Sicily was given special status as an autonomous region.

Sicily has a rich and unique culture, especially with regard to the arts, music, literature, cuisine and architecture. Sicily also holds importance for archeological and ancient sites such as the Necropolis of Pantalica, the Valley of the Temples and Selinunte.

[Source]

Binnacle holds the compass

This is the binnacle which can be found aboard #Makulu

binnacle is a waist-high case or stand on the deck of a ship, generally mounted in front of the helmsman, in which navigational instruments are placed for easy and quick reference as well as to protect the delicate instruments. Its traditional purpose was to hold the ship's magnetic compass, mounted in gimbals to keep it level while the ship pitched and rolled. A binnacle may be subdivided into sections and its contents typically include one or more compasses and an oil lamp or other light source. Other devices such as a sand timer for estimating speed may have been stored in the binnacle as well.

The construction of many early (mid-18th century) binnacles used iron nails, which were later discovered to cause magnetic deviations in compass readings. As the development of the compass and understanding of magnetism progressed, greater attention was given to binnacle construction to avoid compass disturbances caused by iron.

With the introduction of iron-clad ships the magnetic deviation observed in compasses became more severe. Methods of compensation by arranging iron or magnetic objects near the binnacle were developed. In 1854, a new type of binnacle was patented by John Gray of Liverpool which directly incorporated adjustable correcting magnets on screws or rack and pinions. This was improved again when Lord Kelvin patented in the 1880s another system of compass and which incorporated two compensating magnets. These are colloquially known as "Kelvin's Balls"[1] in the UK, and "Navigator's Balls" in the US.

[Source]

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My Project for Educators: Beautiful Nation Project

Would you like to take part in the world's first virtual tour of the planet?

Visit our campaign page and jump aboard! (http://igg.me/at/beautifulnation/x/5499058)

The Beautiful Nation Project will track the voyage of Makulu, a 43 foot sailing vessel on around-the-world circumnavigation, in order to foster a sense of wonder and enthusiasm for exploration among youth.

Video by Masha Gvozdov, Jessica Lee. Additional footage by Shane Duckworth, Jordan Pardes, and additional animation by Aki Tudor.

Special thanks to the students at P.S. 682 the Academy of Talent Scholars, M.S. 218 Rafael Hernandez Dual Language School, and Maris Jaffe at P.S. 206!

Profile Information

Hometown:
Tampa
Why do you wish to join this community?
I am a collector and a Ning developer who can help migrate network to 3.0
About Me:
I am a grad student of applied anthropology and a National Geographic map collector. I happen to also freelance as a Ning developer and would like to offer help with migrating the network to 3.0 if needed.
Website:
http://beautifulnationproject.org
Favorite travel destination:
New York

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